Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Alleviates the Motor Dysfunctions in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

  • Harini Narayanam [1]Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Manipal University College Malaysia, Melaka, MALAYSIA.[2]Department of Physiology, Saveetha Medical College, Saveetha Institute of Technical and Medical Sciences (SIMATS), Chennai, Tamil Nadu, INDIA.[3]Unit of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, AIMST University, Kedah, MALAYSIA.
  • Archana Rajagopalan Department of Physiology, Saveetha Medical College, Saveetha Institute of Technical and Medical Sciences (SIMATS), Chennai, Tamil Nadu, INDIA.
  • Subramani Parasuraman Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, AIMST University, Kedah, MALAYSIA.
  • Suresh V Chinni Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Bioscience, and Nursing, MAHSA University, Selangor, MALAYSIA.
  • Parayil Varghese Christapher Department of Pharmacology, Al Shifa College of Pharmacy, Perinthalmanna, Malappuram, Kerala, INDIA.
Keywords: Grip strength, Immobilization time, Locomotor activity, Motor coordination, Parkinson’s disease

Abstract

Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common degenerative disorders of the ageing brain. Currently, there is no cure for PD and most of the available treatments only aim to reverse the dopamine deficiency and relieve its symptoms. Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) is believed to help in relieving motor symptoms of PD. Hence, the present study is planned to evaluate the effect of CVS on behavioral changes in PD Mice. Methods: Twenty-four healthy male Swiss albino mice divided into four groups (n=6) were used for the study. PD was induced by giving an intraperitoneal injection of MPTP for 5 consecutive days. Bilateral CVS was given with hot water (temperature 40°C) for 15 days. Changes in behaviour (locomotor activity, grip strength, motor coordination, immobilization time) were measured on day 1 and day 15 and the results were statistically analysed. Results: The PD group showed a significant decrease in locomotor activity, muscular strength (fall on time), grip strength and immobilization time when compared to the control group, whereas CVS prevented the symptoms of PD when compared with the PD group. Conclusion: Caloric vestibular stimulation was effective in alleviating behavioral alterations in Parkinson-induced mice.

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Impact of CVS on locomotor activity. Values are expressed as mean
Published
2022-10-01
How to Cite
1.
Narayanam H, Rajagopalan A, Parasuraman S, Chinni SV, Christapher PV. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Alleviates the Motor Dysfunctions in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease. ijpi [Internet]. 1Oct.2022 [cited 6Dec.2022];12(4):479-82. Available from: https://jpionline.org/index.php/ijpi/article/view/1697